Intraocular Optic Nerve Tumors

Melanocytoma (Fig. 13.19): These are benign pigmented tumors that primarily occur in blacks. The color of the tumor varies from gray to pitch black. It is often eccentric and extends beyond the margin of the optic disk. In 50% of all cases, one will also observe a peripapillary choroidal nevus. Visual acuity is usually normal, although discrete changes in the visual field my be present.

Astrocytoma (Fig. 13.20): Astrocytomas appear as white reflecting "mulberry" masses that can calcify. Their size can range up to several disk diameters. The tumor is highly vascularized. Visual field defects can result where the tumor is sufficiently large to compress the optic nerve. Astrocytomas

Melanocytoma.

Melanocytoma.

Dog Optic Neuritis
Fig. 13.19 Benign tumor of the optic disk that represents a special form of nevus (arrow).

— Astrocytoma in tuberous sclerosis (Bourneville^ disease).

— Astrocytoma in tuberous sclerosis (Bourneville^ disease).

Mulberry Tumor Optic Nerve

Whitish, "mulberry" tumor on the superior margin of the optic disk (arrow).

Fig. 13.20

Whitish, "mulberry" tumor on the superior margin of the optic disk (arrow).

Fig. 13.20

occur in tuberous sclerosis (Bourneville's disease) and neurofibromatosis (Recklinghausen's disease).

Hemangioma (Fig. 13.21): Capillary hemangiomas are eccentric, round orange-colored vascular deformities on the optic disk (von Hippel disease). They may occur in association with other angiomas, for example in the cerebellum (in von Hippel-Lindau disease).

— Capillary hemangioma in von Hippel disease.

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