Diagnostic considerations Fig 1017

H The diagnosis is made on the basis of a triad of symptoms:

❖ Unilateral red eye with conjunctival or ciliary injection.

❖ Fixed and dilated pupil.

❖ Hard eyeball on palpation.

— Acute glaucoma attack: pupillary block.

— Acute glaucoma attack: pupillary block.

Fig. 10.17 Typical symptoms include:

❖ Conjunctival and ciliary injection (red eye).

❖ Dull, non-reflecting surface with dull corneal reflex.

❖ Opacification of the corneal stroma that obscures the view of the fundus. The iris appears faded, and the anterior chamber is shallow.

❖ The pupil is oval instead of round, and is fixed and moderately dilated.

❖ Intraocular pressure is elevated; the eye is rock hard to palpation.

❖ Severe headache and gastrointestinal symptoms are present.

Fig. 10.17 Typical symptoms include:

❖ Conjunctival and ciliary injection (red eye).

❖ Dull, non-reflecting surface with dull corneal reflex.

❖ Opacification of the corneal stroma that obscures the view of the fundus. The iris appears faded, and the anterior chamber is shallow.

❖ The pupil is oval instead of round, and is fixed and moderately dilated.

❖ Intraocular pressure is elevated; the eye is rock hard to palpation.

❖ Severe headache and gastrointestinal symptoms are present.

Diabetes 2

Diabetes 2

Diabetes is a disease that affects the way your body uses food. Normally, your body converts sugars, starches and other foods into a form of sugar called glucose. Your body uses glucose for fuel. The cells receive the glucose through the bloodstream. They then use insulin a hormone made by the pancreas to absorb the glucose, convert it into energy, and either use it or store it for later use. Learn more...

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