Management After The Procedure

Pain in the recovery room is very variable. In those individuals who have pain, it is most intense almost immediately upon awakening. It may require narcotics for control, but once brought under control, it improves steadily and rapidly. Patients requiring narcotics in the recovery

FIGURE 3 Computed tomography scan at the level of the lesser trochanter in a 45-year-old man. The electrode is seen within an osteoid osteoma of the periosteum. Although the electrode is positioned eccentrically, no portion of the lesion is more than 5 mm from the exposed tip.

FIGURE 3 Computed tomography scan at the level of the lesser trochanter in a 45-year-old man. The electrode is seen within an osteoid osteoma of the periosteum. Although the electrode is positioned eccentrically, no portion of the lesion is more than 5 mm from the exposed tip.

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room are discharged with a prescription for enough oral narcotics to last 24 hours, but seldom need more than one or two doses. Occasionally, a patient will complain of moderate-to-severe pain lasting for several days after the procedure.

The patient remains in the recovery room only until awake enough for discharge (one to two hours). The patient should be able to walk immediately without the use of casts, braces, or crutches, and should resume all daily activities within 24 hours. Physical therapy is not required. Teenaged and adult patients are advised to avoid prolonged running and/or jumping for three months. This is not required for younger children who are unlikely to be involved in serious training programs.

Approximately 50% of patients state that the tumor pain is gone within 24 hours. The remainder improves over the next several days. Symptoms are almost always gone within a week. Subsequent follow-up is minimal and performed at the discretion of the referring clinician.

FIGURE 4 Coronal reformation of axial computed tomography (CT) images of the left tibia in a 12-year-old female demonstrates an elongated tumor in the longitudinal direction. Lesions of this shape frequently must be treated in more than one location to ensure complete coverage. Axial CT images (not shown) revealed a typical lytic lesion having a rounded cross section and showing internal ossification.

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FIGURE 4 Coronal reformation of axial computed tomography (CT) images of the left tibia in a 12-year-old female demonstrates an elongated tumor in the longitudinal direction. Lesions of this shape frequently must be treated in more than one location to ensure complete coverage. Axial CT images (not shown) revealed a typical lytic lesion having a rounded cross section and showing internal ossification.

The radiographic appearance of the tumor changes very slowly after treatment. Within the first month, little or no change is apparent on radiographs. The X-ray examination may become normal after a few months in younger children, but it is not unusual for an asymptomatic density to persist at the tumor site for a year or more in adults.

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Dealing With Back Pain

Dealing With Back Pain

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