Postoperative Care

The external dressing is removed the next day. Postoperative nausea, vomiting, and oscillopsia are to be expected. The degree of postoperative symptoms correlates with the degree of vestibular function preoperatively. A greater amount of vestibular function leads to greater symptoms once the labyrinth has been ablated. Symptoms can be controlled

FIGURE 25 —6 (A) All three canals have been opened. The superior canal is the medial limit of the dissection and the arcuate artery is visible between the superior and horizontal canals. (B) The finished labyrinthectomy prior to removal of the neuroepithelium. All ampullae and the vestibule should be visible.

FIGURE 25 —6 (A) All three canals have been opened. The superior canal is the medial limit of the dissection and the arcuate artery is visible between the superior and horizontal canals. (B) The finished labyrinthectomy prior to removal of the neuroepithelium. All ampullae and the vestibule should be visible.

with vestibular suppressants; the use of suppressants should be conservative, however, as they may cause delayed or decreased compensation. Intravenous fluids should be given until the patient is able to ingest liquids without vomiting.

Patients are encouraged to sit up on the first postoperative day and begin ambulating as soon as possible. Vestibular rehabilitation is started while they are inpatients and continued after discharge. Follow-up in the clinic after 1 week to remove packing or sutures is common.

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