Prognosis and predictive factors

Granular cell tumours are benign and rarely recur, even after conservative removal. Occasional lesions have behaved aggressively and malignant granular cell tumours have been described.

Fig. 4.26 Granular cell tumour. A Prominent pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia of the oral epithelium overlying a granular cell tumour. B The pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia can be mistaken for carcinoma, but careful examination shows eosinophilic granular cells in the connective tisues.

Fig. 4.27 Granular cell tumour. A The granular cells frequently extend close to the overlying epithelium, but do not fuse with it. B The granular cells infiltrate widely and often appear to merge with striated muscle cells. C The granules are PAS positive (Periodic acid Schiff stain). D The granular cells are strongly and uniformly positive for S-100 protein.

Fig. 4.27 Granular cell tumour. A The granular cells frequently extend close to the overlying epithelium, but do not fuse with it. B The granular cells infiltrate widely and often appear to merge with striated muscle cells. C The granules are PAS positive (Periodic acid Schiff stain). D The granular cells are strongly and uniformly positive for S-100 protein.

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