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Plasmids as Replicons

General Properties of Plasmids

Plasmid Families and Incompatibility

Occasional Plasmids are Linear or Made of RNA

Plasmid DNA Replicates by Two Alternative Methods

Control of Copy Number by Antisense RNA

Plasmid Addiction and Host Killing Functions

Many Plasmids Help their Host Cells

Antibiotic Resistance Plasmids

Mechanism of Antibiotic Resistance

Resistance to Beta-Lactam Antibiotics

Resistance to Chloramphenicol

Resistance to Aminoglycosides

Resistance to Tetracycline

Resistance to Sulfonamides and Trimethoprim

Plasmids may Provide Aggressive Characters

Most Colicins Kill by One of Two Different Mechanisms

Bacteria are Immune to their own Colicins

Colicin Synthesis and Release

Virulence Plasmids

Ti-Plasmids are Transferred from Bacteria to Plants The 2 Micron Plasmid of Yeast

Certain DNA Molecules may Behave as Viruses or Plasmids

FIGURE 16.01 Plasmids are Self-Replicating Molecules of DNA

Plasmids are most often rings of double-stranded DNA found inside cells but not attached to or associated with the chromosomal DNA. The plasmid carries its own origin of replication, thus it is considered a true replicon.

FIGURE 16.01 Plasmids are Self-Replicating Molecules of DNA

Plasmids are most often rings of double-stranded DNA found inside cells but not attached to or associated with the chromosomal DNA. The plasmid carries its own origin of replication, thus it is considered a true replicon.

Plasmids are "extra" self-replicating molecules of DNA that are found in many cells.

Plasmids and viruses both rely on the host cell to provide energy and raw materials but plasmids do not damage the host cell.

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