Lineweaver Burk plot

The most commonly used transformation of Eqn [2.1] entails taking the reciprocal of each side of the equation to yield the Lineweaver-Burk, or double reciprocal, plot:

v0 Vmax [A]0 Vmax

A plot of the transformed data pairs (1 /[A]0i, 1/v0i) i = 1,..., N, gives a straight line with ordinate and abscissa intercepts at 1/Vmaxand -1/Km, respectively.

Q: Generate a Lineweaver-Burk plot for the enzyme described in the previous worked example.

A: First we need to generate a Table of ordered pairs (1 /[A]0i, 1/v0i) using our definition of v0 [a_] from the previous example.

IbData =

We then use ListPlot to graph this Table as well as Plot to graph the inverse of v0 [a_] directly.

gphl= ListPlot[IbData,

PlotStyle -> {PointSize[0.02]}, DisplayFunction^Identity] l gph2 = Plot[-

vo [ 1 / recipa] DisplayFunction ^Identity];

Show[gphl, gph2, DisplayFunction^ $DisplayFunction, AxesLabel -> {"1/[A]", "1/v0"}];

6x10

Show[gphl, gph2, DisplayFunction^ $DisplayFunction, AxesLabel -> {"1/[A]", "1/v0"}];

6x10

1000 2000 3000 4000 5000

-1x10

Figure 2.2. Lineweaver-Burk plot for a simple Michaelis-Menten enzyme reaction. Note the ordinate and abscissa intercepts occur at 1/Vmax and -1/Km, respectively.

1000 2000 3000 4000 5000

-1x10

Figure 2.2. Lineweaver-Burk plot for a simple Michaelis-Menten enzyme reaction. Note the ordinate and abscissa intercepts occur at 1/Vmax and -1/Km, respectively.

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