Summary

MRI imaging provides clinically useful information in assessing the elbow joint. Superior depiction of muscles, ligaments, and tendons and the ability to directly visualize nerves, bone marrow, and hyaline cartilage are advantages of MRI relative to conventional imaging techniques. Ongoing improvements in surface coil design and newer pulse sequences have resulted in higher-quality MRI of the elbow. Traumatic and degenerative disorders of the elbow are well seen with MRI. The sequelae of medial traction and lateral compression from valgus stress include medial collateral ligament injury, common flexor tendon abnormalities, medial traction spurs, ulnar neuropathy, and osteochondritis dissecans. These conditions, as well as lateral collateral ligament injury and lateral epicondylitis, may be characterized with MRI. Post-traumatic osseous abnormalities well seen with MRI include radiographically occult fractures, stress fractures, bone contusions, and apophyseal avulsions. MRI also can be used to assess cartilaginous extension of fractures in children. Intra-articular loose bodies can be identified with MRI, especially if fluid or contrast material is present within the elbow joint. Biceps and triceps tendon injuries can be diagnosed and characterized. MRI also can provide additional information regarding entrapment neuropathies about the elbow. MRI perhaps is most useful when patients have not responded to nonoperative therapy, and surgery, as well as additional diagnoses, is being considered.

Cure Tennis Elbow Without Surgery

Cure Tennis Elbow Without Surgery

Everything you wanted to know about. How To Cure Tennis Elbow. Are you an athlete who suffers from tennis elbow? Contrary to popular opinion, most people who suffer from tennis elbow do not even play tennis. They get this condition, which is a torn tendon in the elbow, from the strain of using the same motions with the arm, repeatedly. If you have tennis elbow, you understand how the pain can disrupt your day.

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