Neurological Pathways

Neurological pathways extend from locations in the spinal cord to various areas of the body. These pathways contain two types of nerve fibers. These preganglionic and postganglionic fibers are connected together by a ganglion. The pre-ganglionic nerve fiber carries messages from the central nervous system to the ganglion. The postganglionic nerve fiber transmits that message to specific tissues and organs from the ganglion.

Neurological pathways in the sympathetic nervous system originate from the thoracic (T1 to T12) and the upper lumbar segments (L1 and L2) of the spinal cord. This is why the sympathetic nervous system is also referred to as the tho-racolumbar division of the autonomic nervous system.

The preganglionic fibers of the sympathetic nervous system extend from the spinal cord to the ganglionic fiber. These are relatively short. However, sympathetic postganglionic fibers are long from the ganglion to the body cells.

Neurological pathways in the parasympathetic nervous system originate from cranial nerves III, VII, IX, and X from the brain stem and the sacral segments S2, S3, and S4 from the spinal cord. This is why the parasympathetic nervous system is also known as the craniosacral division of the autonomic nervous system.

Preganglionic fibers are long from the spinal cord to the ganglion and the postganglionic fibers are short from the ganglion to the body cells.

0 0

Post a comment