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Prevalence per 1000 population of individual neurological disorders

Please note that prevalence and YLDs are available for the neurological cause - sequela combinations. These data are therefore provided for all neurological disorders within the neuropsychiatric category, cerebrovascular disease, combined for neuroinfections and neurological sequelae of infections (poliomyelitis, tetanus, meningitis, Japanese encephalitis, syphilis, pertussis, diphtheria, malaria), neurological sequelae associated with nutritional deficiencies and neuropathies (protein-energy malnutrition, iodine deficiency, leprosy, and diabetes mellitus), and neurological sequelae associated with injuries (road traffic accidents, poisonings, falls, fires, drownings, other unintentional injuries, self-inflicted injuries, violence, war, and other intentional injuries) (see Table 2.1).

While YLDs are separately estimated for each sequela, death (and hence YLLs and DALYs) are only estimated at the cause level, and for many causes it is not possible to describe sequela-specific deaths. The tables for DALYs and deaths therefore only describe data for neurological cause categories (Table 2.2).

Table 2.1 Neurological disorder groupings used for YLDs and prevalence data

Neurological disorders in neuropsychiatrie category

Disorders/injuries with neurological sequelae in other categories

Epilepsy

Alzheimer and other dementias Parkinson's disease Multiple sclerosis Migraine

Cerebrovascular disease Neuroinfections

Nutritional deficiencies and neuropathies Neurological injuries

Table 2.2 Neurological disorder groupings used for DALYs and deaths data

Neurological disorders in neuropsychiatric category

Disorders/injuries with neurological sequelae in other categories

Epilepsy

Alzheimer and other dementias Parkinson's disease Multiple sclerosis Migraine

Cerebrovascular disease

Poliomyelitis

Tetanus

Meningitis

Japanese encephalitis

Regional and income categories

Projections of mortality and burden of disease are summarized according to two groupings of countries, as follows.

■ WHO regions. WHO Member States are grouped into six regions (Africa, the Americas, South-East Asia, Europe, Eastern Mediterranean and Western Pacific, see http://www.who. int/about/regions/en/index.html). WHO regions are organizational groupings and, while they are largely based on geographical terms, are not synonymous with geographical areas. For further disaggregation of the global burden of disease, the regions have been further divided into 14 epidemiological subregions, based on levels of child (under five years of age) and adult (aged 15-59 years) mortality for WHO Member States (Table 2.3). When these mortality strata are applied to the six WHO regions, they produce 14 mortality subregions. These are listed in Annex 1, together with the WHO Member States in each group.

Table 2.3 Definitions of mortality strata used to define subregions

Mortality stratum

Child mortality

Adult mortality

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