Chapter References

2. Roberts, P. (1996). Will you stand up in court? On the admissibility of psychiatric and psychological evidence. Journal of Forensic Psychiatry, 7, 63-78.

3. Kenny, A. (1994). The psychiatric expert in court. Psychological Medicine, 14, 291-302.

4. Department of Health and Welsh Office (1999). Code of practice, Mental Health Act 1983. HMSO, London.

6. B v. Croydon District Health Authority [1995] 1 All ER 683.

7. Re C (Refusal of Medical Treatment) [1994] 1 FLR 31.

9. Gunn, M. (1996). Treatment. Journal of Forensic Psychiatry, 7, 362-7.

10. Law Commission (1995) Mental incapacity. Law Commission no. 231. HMSO, London.

11. Sheldrick, C. (1998). Child psychiatrists in court: their contribution as experts in child care proceedings. Journal of Forensic Psychiatry, 9, 249-66.

12. Reder, P. and Lucey, C. (ed.) (1995). Assessment of parenting: psychiatric and psychological contributions. Routledge, London.

13. Law Commission (1995). Liability for psychiatric illness. Consultation paper no. 137. HMSO, London.

14. Stone, A.A. (1993). Post-traumatic stress disorder and the law: critical review of the new frontier. Bulletin of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law, 21, 23-36.

15. Judicial Studies Board (1994). Guidelines for the assessment of general damages in personal injury cases (2nd edn). Blackstone Press, London.

16. Woolf, Lord (1996). Access to justice. HMSO, London.

17. Hoggett, B. (1996). Mental health law (4th edn). Sweet and Maxwell, London.

18. Gudjonnson, G.H. (1992). The psychology of interrogations, confessions and testimony. Wiley, Chichester.

21. Home Office/Department of Health and Social Security (1975). Report of the Committee on Mentally Abnormal Offenders. Cmnd 6224. HMSO, London.

22. Law Commission (1989). A criminal code for England and Wales. Law Commission no. 177. HMSO, London.

23. Smith, A. (1998). Psychiatric evidence and discretionary life sentences. Journal of Forensic Psychiatry, 9, 17-38.

24. Solomka, B. (1996). The role of psychiatric evidence in passing 'longer than normal' sentences. Journal of Forensic Psychiatry, 7, 239-55.

25. Brodsky, S.L. (1991). Testifying in court: guidelines and maxims for the expert witness. American Psychological Association, Washington, DC.

26. Stone, A.A. (1984). The ethical boundaries of forensic psychiatry: a view from the ivory tower. Bulletin of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law, 12, 209-19.

27. Appelbaum, P.S. (1990). The parable of the forensic psychiatrist: ethics and the problem of doing harm. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, 13, 249-59.

28. Stone, A.A. (1994). Revisiting the parable: truth without consequences. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, 17, 79-97.

29. Appelbaum, P.S. (1997). A theory of ethics for forensic psychiatry. Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law, 25, 233-47.

30. American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law (1995). Ethical guidelines for the practice of forensic psychiatry. AAPL, Bloomfield, CT.

31. Appelbaum, P.S. and Gutheil, T.G. (1991). Clinical handbook of psychiatry and the law (2nd edn). Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore, MD.

Break Free From Passive Aggression

Break Free From Passive Aggression

This guide is meant to be of use for anyone who is keen on developing a better understanding of PAB, to help/support concerned people to discover various methods for helping others, also, to serve passive aggressive people as a tool for self-help.

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