Medical Organizations

Asthma Free Forever

Asthma Free Forever By Jerry Ericson

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The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAI): <http://allergy.mcg.edu>

The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI): <www.allergy.mcg.edu/physicians/latex.html>

ACAAI has issued guidelines urging hospital employee health services to take a leadership position in identifying, managing and preventing latex-related problems among workers. Among their recommendations is that the FDA should establish maximum levels of extractable latex allergens in gloves and that the use of powdered, high-protein latex gloves should be discouraged. In 1997, the ACAAI and the AAAI published a joint statement advocating the use of powder-free, low-allergen gloves to reduce aeroallergen exposure.

The American Academy of Dermatology: <www.aad.org>

The American Academy of Dermatology released its Position Paper on Latex Allergy in July 1998. Among its recommendations are: 1) Encourage all food preparation services to use only non-latex gloves. 2) Routinely use latex-safe operating rooms for all trauma surgery. 3) Encourage all medical facilities to exclusively use powder-free gloves with low latex allergen levels. 4) Encourage all medical facilities to provide non-latex gloves for general physical examinations. This document also provides a detailed description of a "latex-safe" environment.

The American Medical Association (AMA): <www.ama-assn.org>

The House of Delegates of the AMA has passed resolutions in 1996 (503, A-96) and 1997 (504, I-97), which "supports the appropriate labeling of latex containing medical devices with warnings about possible allergic reactions. The AMA strongly encourages health care facilities to provide non-latex alternatives of at least comparable efficacy alongside their latex counterparts in all areas of patient care."

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Coping with Asthma

Coping with Asthma

If you suffer with asthma, you will no doubt be familiar with the uncomfortable sensations as your bronchial tubes begin to narrow and your muscles around them start to tighten. A sticky mucus known as phlegm begins to produce and increase within your bronchial tubes and you begin to wheeze, cough and struggle to breathe.

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