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Fig. 3.12 The extracellular proteome of S. aureus RN6390 at low (green image) and high cell densities (red image). 250 ig proteins ofthe supernatant of cells grown in TSB medium at an optical density OD540 = 1 and 5 were separated by 2-D gels and stained with Sypro

Ruby. Extracellular proteins present in increased amounts at high cell densities are labeled red and those proteins only present at low cell densities are labeled green. (This figure also appears with the color plates.)

tors. The differential proteomics display can also be used to visualize the entire set of extracellular proteins in the wild type compared to mutants. On the basis of a comparison between the secretomes of a wild type and its corresponding mutant strains, many extracellular proteins have been allocated to the individual regulons, showing both already known and also new members ofthe regulons [38, 39]. Figure 3.13 gives an overview ofthe structure of a few selected virulence regulons. The definite function of still unknown members of the virulence regulon, however, needs to be verified in specific follow-up studies analyzing the expression and role of the protein in infection model systems. The proteomic approach is also a useful tool for analyzing the extracellular protein pattern of different clinical isolates which may help to correlate the individual diseases with the gene expression and protein secretion pattern [42]. Recent studies indicate that this pathogenicity network is not confined to the interactions between SarA, agr, SaeR, ArlR, or rB. Many more global regulators seem to be encoded in the genome sequence [41]. A combined application oftranscriptomics and proteomics ofthe

Optical dcnsitiy

Optical dcnsitiy

Optical densitiy

SaiD1

SplA

suis

SpIC

Spit

SplF

SSfhA

Sspw

Vlnl

Optical densitiy

SaiD1

SplA

suis

SpIC

Spit

SplF

SSfhA

Sspw

Vlnl

A/B

A/C

0 0

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