Primates Unknown

Primates are an order of mammals (Order Primates) to which human beings and about 200 other living species belong. In general, they have round skulls containing brains that are large relative to body weight, high foreheads, eyes with stereoscopic vision, hands that can grasp and manipulate, fingers and toes with sensitive pads and nails instead of claws, mobile arms and ankles, and two mammary glands. Rocks in North America, Europe, and Asia from the Paleocene, 65-54 million years ago, are the...

Irizima

Dinosaur-like animal of Central Africa, similar to the MoKELE-MbEMBE. Etymology Unknown, the thing that may not be spoken of. Physical description Larger than a hippopotamus. Black. Long neck. Said to have rhinolike horns. Behavior Produces 3-foot-high waves in the water with its breathing. Distribution Lake Edward, in both the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Uganda. Possible explanation A waterspout, suggested by E. A. Tempi e-Perkins. Sources Fulahn William Hichens , On the Trail of the...

Getqun

Etymology Na-Den word. GIANT ANACONDA reportedly killed by the Brazilian Boundary Commission in 1932. (William M. Rebsamen Fortean Picture Library) GIANT ANACONDA reportedly killed by the Brazilian Boundary Commission in 1932. (William M. Rebsamen Fortean Picture Library) Distribution Lake Iliamna, Alaska. Source Kyle Mizokami, Bigfoot-Like Figures in North American Folklore and Tradition, bigfoot-folklore.html.

Waracabra Tiger

Etymology After Waracabra, the Guyanese name for the Gray-winged trumpeter (Psophia crepitans), because of this bird's loud cry. Variant names Warracaba jaguar, Y'agamish-eri (Akawaio Carib). P hysical description Like the common jaguar but variable in size and color. Behavior Hunts in large packs of up to 100, unlike normal jaguars, which are solitary hunters. Howls loudly. Heard but rarely seen. Not afraid of fire. Hates water and dogs. Frightened by the barking of dogs. Significant sighting...

Bis Cobra

Behavior Its bite is said to be as venomous as twenty cobras. Unlike other lizards, it spits its venom. Distribution Northern India. Possible explanations (1) A harmless gecko (Eublepharis hardwickii) of east India and Bangladesh. The related Leopard gecko (E. macularius) also has a reputation in Pakistan as a venomous reptile. (2) A composite animal, a hybrid of poisonous snakes and harmless lizards. Source Sherman A. Minton Jr. and Madge Rutherford Minton, Venomous Reptiles (New York...

Australian Camel

A native population of camel, a Hoofed MamMAL, said to exist in Australia prior to 1840. Variant name Big one bullocky. Distribution Northern Territory, Australia. Significant sighting A solitary camel was occasionally seen by Aborigines in the north, perhaps as early as the 1830s. It was rumored to have been brought by an early white settler. Possible explanation It is possible that a few camels were brought to Australia prior to the beginning of official and typically strict importation...

Hoan Kiem Turtle

Giant freshwater turtle of Southeast Asia. Etymology Vietnamese (Austroasiatic), returned sword, after the legend by which the lake got its name. Scientific name Rafetus hoankiemensis, given by Ha Dinh Duc. Physical description Possibly the world's largest freshwater turtle. Length, 5 feet-6 feet 6 inches. Width, 3 feet. Weight, 440 pounds. Gray, mottled upper shell. Pinkish belly. Distribution Hoan Kiem Lake in Hanoi, Vietnam. Significant sightings The turtle's first appearance was around...

Isiququmadevu

Dinosaur-like animal of Central Africa, similar to the MOKELE-MBEMBE Etymology Lozi (Bantu) word. Variant names Ing'ondotuya, Lengol engol e, Lingongol e. Physical description Length, 20-40 feet. Larger than an elephant. Head is like a snake's. Long neck. Lizardl ike l egs. Behavior Amphibious. Tracks Makes wide furrows in the reeds and mud. Habitat Swamps, rivers. Distribution Zambezi River from the Barotse Floodplain to Victoria Falls, Zambia. Significant sightings Lewanika, king of...

Gargouille

Etymology French, gargler. Variant name Gargoyle. Physical description Serpentine. Scaly head. Slender snout. Eyes that gleam like moonstones. Long neck. Four membranous flippers. Behavior Shoots jets of water from its mouth. Lives in a cave on the riverbank. Capsizes boats. Eats people. Distribution Seine River in Normandy, France. Significant sighting A scaly monster emerged from the Seine River near Rouen, France, in the early seventh century and caused flooding...

Nguma Monene

Etymology Lingala (Bantu), large boa. Variant names Ngonde monene, Nyama monene, Yoli (Baka Ubangi). PP'hysical description Huge, serpentine lizard. Length, 30-50 feet. Body is 2-3 feet in diameter. Grayish-brown. Head and neck are snakelike. Forked tongue. Serrated ridge along the spine. Short legs. Behavior Amphibious. Moves rapidly through swamps. Eats birds and monkeys. Distribution Eastern Cameroon Motaba River, Republic of the Congo. Significant sightings...

Carolina Parakeet

Small Bird of the Parrot family (Psittacidae) in the southeastern United States, presumed extinct since 1918. Scientific name Conuropsis carolinensis, given by Tommaso Salvadori in 1891. Physical description Bright green plumage. Yellow head. Orange forehead and cheeks. Distribution Santee River, South Carolina Okefenokee Swamp, Georgia Okeechobee County, Florida. Significant sightings Henry Redding reported a flock of thirty parakeets near Fort Drum Creek, Florida, in 1920. In 1926, Charles E....

Bornean Tiger

Unrecognized big CAT of Southeast Asia. Significant sightings In the late 1990s, Erik Meijaard collected scattered evidence from the north, east, and interior of Borneo that tigers existed there in recent times. Tiger skins, skulls, and teeth are in the possession of some of the indigenous peoples, and sightings have occurred as recently as 1995. Possible explanations Either a remnant population of Tigers (Panthera tigris) has existed on the island since the Pleistocene or, at some point in the...

Rakshi Bompo

Alternate name for the Yeti of Central Asia. Etymology Tibetan Indo-Aryan hybrid word meaning powerful demon, according to Gordon Creighton. Rakshasa are Hindu demons from the Ramayana in some old epics, they were the pre-Aryan inhabitants of India. Ratkshi is a Nepali alcoholic drink made from rice or millet. Rag tse is Tibetan for stone. Bonpo was a priest of the religion of Tibet prior to Buddhism, often in charge of exorcisms. Variant name Ragshi. Physical description Height, 4-6 feet....

Horned Hare

Legendary Rabbit of West Asia, Europe, and the United States. Variant names Jackalope (in the United States, jackrabbit + antelope), Raurackl (Old German), Wolpertinger (in Bavaria). Physical description Rabbit with antlers or horns. Distribution Western and midwestern United States southern Germany West Asia. Significant sightings The horned Raurackl was generally known to Bavarian hunters of the sixteenth century and appeared in a contemporary print by Joris Hoefnagel. German naturalist Peter...

Caribbean Monk Seal

Nondescript Seal of the West Indies, presumed extinct since 1952. Scientific name Monachus tropicalis, given by Gray in 1850. Physical description Length, 7-8 feet. Brown on the back with a gray tinge. Behavior Approachable and unaggressive. Distribution Caribbean Sea, off Haiti and Jamaica. It formerly extended throughout the northern and western Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico. Significant sightings Sixteen out of ninety-three Haitian and Jamaican fishermen interviewed in 1997 claimed to...

Three Starred Anglerfish

One of Beebe's Abyssal Fishes of the North Atlantic Ocean. Scientific name Bathyceratias trilynchus, given by William Beebe. Physical description Oval anglerfish. Length, 6 inches. Black. Three fishing rod antennae (illicia) on the head tipped with a pale-yellow light organ. Small eyes. Significant sighting Observed only once at 2,470 feet by William Beebe in a bathysphere off Bermuda in the early 1930s. Possible explanation Unknown species allied to the Angler fishes (Family Ceratiidae)....

Manipogo

Freshwater Monster of Manitoba, Canada. Etymology Named by Tom Locke in 1960, in imitation of Ogopogo. Variant name Manny. Physical description Serpentine. Length, 10-40 feet. Brownish-black upper body. At least one hump. Flat, diamond-shaped head. Behavior Bellows like a train whistle. Distribution Lake Manitoba, Manitoba. The animal's name is also used as a synonym for WinniPOGO in other Manitoban lakes. Significant sightings Louis Betecher and Eddie Nipanik saw a serpentine animal in the...

Wyoming Mummy

SMALL Hominid of western North America. Variant name Pedro. Physical description Height, 6.5 inches sitting 14 inches estimated total. Weight, 0.75 pound. Dark-brown, wrinkled skin. Gray head-hair. Flat head. Flat nose. Wide mouth with full lips. Pointed teeth. Thick arm-hair. Spatular fingernails. Distribution Pedro Mountains, Wyoming. Significant sighting In October 1932, two prospectors, C. Main and F. Carr, came across a small cave in the Pedro Mountains, Carbon County, Wyoming, in which a...

Horses Head

Physical description Length, 6-30 feet. Head is like a horse's. Behavior Swims swiftly. Travels on land between lakes. Tourists used to put cartons of cream in the water for the monster to drink. Distribution Baskatong Lake, Lac Bitobi, Lac Blue Sea, Lac-des-C dres, Lac Creux, Lac D sert, Gatineau River, Lac Pocknock, and Lac Trente-et-un-Milles, all in Qu bec. Significant sighting Around 1910, Olivier Garneau was fishing in Lac Blue Sea when he saw a...

Yeti

Etymology Sherpa or Newari (Sino-Tibetan) word. Said to be pronounced yeh-tay. Meaning and origin not established, though one derivation is rock animal yeh (snowy mountain or rocky area) + teh (animal). Another is that teh is the same as dred (bear). (Interestingly, in modern Tibetan, dred pa means contempt or disgust, as in Abominable SNOWMAN.) Te can be a particle attached to a verb and means when, after, thus, although, or forms a gerund (-ing) ye has the meaning of primordial or first. Yi...

Nakani

Cannibal Giant of northwestern North America. Etymology Chipewyan, Gwich'in, and Slavey (Na-Dene), bush man or bad Indian. Variant names Arulataq (Central Yupik Eskimo-Aleut, bellowing man), Brush man (Western Canada Gwich'in Na-Dene), Bushman, Enemy (Dogrib Na-Dene), Hairy man, Mahoni (in Peel River area, Yukon), Na'in, Nakentlia (Koyukon Na-Dene, sneaker), Nant'ina (Tanaina Na-Dene), Neginla-eh (Pacific Gulf Yupik Eskimo-Aleut, wood man), Nik'inla'eena, Nuk-luk, Tinjih-rui (black man),...

Bergmans Bear

Distinct variety or subspecies of brown Bear of East Asia. Physical description Black. Short fur. Exceedingly large. Weight, 1,100-2,500 pounds. Large skull. Tracks Size, 14.5 inches by 10 inches. Distribution Southern Kamchatka Peninsula, Siberia. Present status This giant variety is likely extinct. The last known specimen, a pelt from Ust'-Kamchatsk, was examined by Swedish zoologist Sten Bergman in 1920. Possible explanation Brown bears (Ursus arctos) vary considerably in appearance this may...

Cheval Marin

Sea Monster of the coastal waters of Canada and West Africa. Etymology French, sea horse. PP'hysical description Horselike head. Clawed forearms. Fishlike, scaly tail. Behavior Neighs like a horse. Distribution Ile Brion and Rivi re-St.-Jean, Qu bec, Canada West Africa. PP'ossible explanations (1) Explorer Jacques Cartier saw two Walruses ( Odobenus rosmarus) on the Ile Brion in 1534 and fish-shaped, horselike animals in a river that may have been the modern Rivi re-St.-Jean off the St....

Mbielu MbieluMbielu

Unknown DlNOSAUR-like animal of Central Africa. Etymology Possibly Lingala (Bantu). P hysical description Has large planks growing out of its back, which is covered with green, algal growth. Behavior Almost always seen in water with its back protruding. Active in the late afternoon. Distribution Likouala River, Republic of the Congo. Significant sightings A Mbielu-mbielu-mbielu was seen near Epena at a place called Ikekesse. Green vegetable growth was visible on its back as it came out of the...

Gowrow

Etymology From the sound the lizards make. Physical description Length, up to 20 feet. Tusklike teeth. Behavior Makes an assortment of groans and hisses. Distribution Boone and Searcy Counties, northern Arkansas. Significant sighting Sometime before 1935, E. J. Rhodes heard a commotion in a deep cavern called Devil's Hole, 3 miles northwest of Myrtle, Arkansas. He crawled down 200 feet to investigate, but couldn't see anything. Later, when he lowered a flatiron on a rope into the cavern,...

Mermaid

Fish-tailed MERBEING of the Atlantic Ocean. Etymology Middle English, mere (sea) + maide (maid). Variant names Merfolk (plural), Merman (for the male). Also Ben-varrey (Manx), Bocto-gai (Irish), Ceasg (Gaelic), Dinny-mara (Manx), Doinney varrey (Manx, for the male), Hav-MAND, Homen marinho (Portuguese), Liban, Maighdean mhara (Irish), Merrow (Irish), Mer-rymaid (in Cornwall, England), Mhaidan mhare (Scots Gaelic), Morgan (Breton, sea woman), Morverch (Breton, sea daughter), Muirgheilt (Irish),...

Giant Hyrax of Shaanxi

P hysical description A stocky quadruped with a head like a hyrax's, single hooves, and a short, hippopotamus-like tail. Distribution Shaanxi Province, China. Significant sighting Chinese bronze statuettes, at least one of which is from Shaanxi Province and dates from the Period of Warring States (403-221 b.c.), depict this animal. P ossible explanation P liohyrax, a hyrax about the size of a large pig that lived in China 2 million years ago, in the Late Pliocene. It is only known from fossil...

Kakundakari

Etymology Konjo, Nyanga, and Kanu (Bantu) word. Scientific name Congopithecus, proposed by Charles Cordier in July 1960 amended to Congopithecus cordieri by Heini Hediger in October 1960. Variant names Amajungi (Komo Bantu), KiKCMBA (possibly the male or adult of the species), Lisisingo (Poke Bantu), Mbatcha (Tembo Bantu), Niaka-ambuguza (Lega-Mwenga Bantu). Physical description Height, 2 3 feet. Gray skin. Covered with thin hair except for the face. Long, black head-hair shaped in pageboy...

Minhocao

Mystery Amphibian of Central and South America. Etymology Portuguese, giant earthworm. Variant names Mi ocao, Sierpe (snake, in Nicaragua). Physical description Serpentine. Length, up to 150 feet. Width, 15 feet. Black. Covered in thick, bony armored skin or scales. Two horns on its head. Piglike snout. Behavior Amphibious and subterranean. Knocks over trees, collapses roads, and creates new river channels with its burrowing in the ground. Most active after rainy weather. Overturns boats....

Ksy Gyik

Scientific name Primihomo asiaticus, proposed by V. A. Khakhlov in 1914. Etymology From the Kyrgyz (Turkic) kishi (man) + giik (wild or powerful). Variant names Kiik-adam, Kiik-kish, Kish-kiik, Kishi-kiyik. Physical description Height, 5 feet. Covered with dark-brown or yellowish, shaggy hair. Sloping forehead. Arched browridges. Small nose with large nostrils. Ears are large, lobeless, and backward-pointing. Massive lower jaw. No chin. A hump on the back of the neck. Long arms....

Giant Mediterranean Octopus

Large Cephaopod of the Mediterranean Sea. Physical description Octopus with arms longer than 10 feet. Distribution Mediterranean Sea off France and Greece. Significant sightings A large octopus might have inspired the Greek myths of the six-necked, twelve-footed, cave-dwelling sea creature Scylla that attacked Odysseus's crew in the Strait of Messina, Italy, or the nine-headed, serpentine Hydra that Herakles killed in the marshes of Lerna south of Argos in the Peloponnesus, Greece. An octopus...

Mono Grande

Etymology Spanish, big monkey. Variant names Mojan (Arawakan), Mono rey (king monkey). Physical description Tailless, apelike creature. Height, 5-6 feet. Behavior Arboreal. Runs with an odd, leaping gait. Call is an eerie howling sound. Throws stones at huts at night. Uses branches as weapons. Said to interbreed with the Indians. Distribution Serran a de Parij of Colombia and Venezuela eastern Venezuela R o Paute, eastern Ecuador R o Madidi area, Bolivia...

Ground Shark

Physical description Larger than a great white shark, which has an average length of 14 feet. No prominent dorsal fin. Behavior Lies in wait for other fishes on the ocean floor. Said to be a man-eater. Distribution Timor Sea. Possible explanation A giant form of Wobbe-gong shark (Family Orectolobidae), suggested by Karl Shuker. The Spotted wobbegong (Orec-tolobus maculatus) inhabits Australasian waters and grows to 10 feet 6 inches. It feeds on the bottom but attacks waders and fishers in tidal...

Challenger Deep Flatfish

A flat abyssal Fish of the North Pacific Ocean. Etymology Named after the Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench. Physical description Solelike. Two distinct eyes. Habitat Visits or inhabits abyssal oceanic depths where no light penetrates. Distribution The Mariana Trench, east of Guam. Significant sighting On January 23, 1960, the bathyscaph Trieste, piloted by Jacques Piccard and Donald Walsh, reached a record depth of 35,800 feet (7 miles) in the Challenger Deep. As they touched down on the...

Mac Farlanes Bear

Unknown variety of Bear of northern Canada. Scientific name Vetularctos inopinatus, proposed by C. Hart Merriam in 1918. P hysical description Whit ish buff t o pale yellowish buff, dar kening t o pale r eddish br own on the underside. Broad head. Ears set like a dog's. Square, long muzzle. Teeth are unlike the brown bear's, presenting a combination of long canines and well-developed cusps with broadly flattened surfaces the cusps of the upper first and second molars are reduced, while the...

Chagljevi

The size of a puppy. Behavior Nocturnal. Afraid of humans. Distribution Montenegro Republic, Yugoslavia. Possible explanation The Golden jackal (Canis aureus) is still found in southeastern Eu rope, as far west as Italy and as far north as Austria. It stands 15-20 inches at the shoulder. Source Marcus Scibanicus, Strange Creatures from Slavic Folklore, North American BioFortean Review 3, no. 2 (October 2001) 56-63, http www.strangeark.com nabr NABR7.pdf.

Oldeani Monster

Scientific name Chamaeleo oldeanii, proposed by Peter Scott. Physical description Chameleon-like. Brown, with small red spots and a horizontal stripe across each flank. Small horn at the tip of its snout. Long tail. Distribution Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania. Significant sighting On February 25, 1962, Peter Scott and John and Jane Hunter saw a large chameleon in the Ngorongoro Conservation Area near Oldeani Peak, Tanzania. They captured it, and Scott took it back to England, where it...

Tsy AombyAomby

Etymology Malagasy (Austronesian), not cow cow perhaps from the Swahili (Bantu) si n'gombe, not cow. Variant names Kilopilopitsofy (floppy ears), Lalomena, MANGARSAHOC, Omby-rano (water cow, in Mainarivo District), Railalom-ena (ancestor of the hippopotamus), Son-gomby, Tsomgomby. Physical description Looks like a water buffalo without a hump like a hippopotamus or like a cow, horse, or mule without horns or cloven hooves. Size of a cow. Dark skin. Some...

Montana Nessie

Physical description Apparently, two types of animal are involved. Large animal Eel-shaped. Length, 20-40 feet. Brown to bluish-black. Head like a snake's. Distinctive, steel-black eyes. Dorsal fin sometimes reported. Small animal Like a large fish. Length, 6-10 feet. Behavior Swims on the surface with vertical undulations. Often seen cavorting in the water, which could be either playfulness or feeding behavior. Distribution Flathead Lake, Montana. Significant sightings In 1889, Capt. James C....

Patagonian Plesiosaur

Physical description Long neck like a swan's, held high above the water. Behavior Nocturnal. Can travel on land. Distribution The lake region of Chubut Province, Argentina, including Lago Blanco the adjacent region of Chile. Significant sightings The director of the Jard n Zool gico at Buenos Aires, Clemente onelli, interviewed a farmer who lived on Lago Blanco in 1897 about strange, nocturnal noises heard along the lake's pebbly shore. A long-necked animal could sometimes be seen on moonlit...

Pygmy Elephant

Scientific names Elephas africana pumilio, given by Theodore Noack in 1906 Elephas fransseni, given by Henri Schouteden in 1914. These designations have changed to Loxodonta a. pumilio and L. fransseni with the taxonomic switch of African elephants from Elephas to Loxodonta a few years later. Variant names Abele (Kari Bantu), Esemasa, Essala (in Central African Republic), Kowuru, Lokpaka (in southern Cameroon), M'bakiri (Banda Ubangi), Messala (in Cameroon and the Republic of the Congo),...

Yunwi Tsunsdi

Little People of the southeastern United States. Variant names Tsundige'wi, Yunwee chuns dee. Physical description Height, 2 feet. Black hair reaches to the ground. Behavior Scoops out nests in sand and lines them with grass. Speaks Cherokee or an unknown dialect. Eats pigeons, tiny deer, and wild plums. Wears primitive clothes. Likes to play drums and dance. Habitat Rock slides, thickets, bluffs, and mountain balds. Distribution Northern Georgia western North Carolina. Sources James Mooney,...

Almasti

Etymology Kabardian (Circassian) word, said to mean forest man. Seemingly derivative of the Mongolian Almas possibly borrowed from the Mongolian-speaking Kalmyks to the north in Kalmykia. Variant names Almasty, Gubganana (for the female). Physical description Height, 5-6 feet. Weight, up to 500 pounds. Reddish, shaggy body-hair. Long, tangled head-hair. Slanted and reddish eyes. Flattened nose. Prominent cheekbones. Receding lower jaw. Females have breasts. Short, bowed legs. Splayed feet....

Surrey Puma

Etymology A newspaper term coined in August 1964 when a large cat was reported in the Farnham and Odiham area on the Surrey-Hampshire border. Physical description Pumalike big cat. Length, 3-6 feet. Shoulder height, 2 feet 6 inches-3 feet. Gold, beige, reddish, or black in color. Large paws. Tail, 2 feet 6 inches long. Behavior Usually nocturnal. Has a strong odor of ammonia. Makes screaming or hissing sounds. Dogs and foxes are terrified of it. Kills both...

Morgawr

Probably coined by Noel Wain of the Falmouth Packet in 1976. Physical description Length, 17-20 feet. Gray skin. Long neck. Several large humps. Long tail. Behavior Said (by Tony Shiels) to be attracted to naked women, especially young Wiccans. Distribution Cornwall, England, especially Falmouth Bay. Significant sightings On August 3, 1906, officers Spicer and Cuming of the American transatlantic liner St. Andrew saw a sea monster with a head 18 feet long and...

Asia

Former king Jigme Dorji Wangchuck saw a white, fast-swimming animal in a lake in this park. Desmond Doig, Bhutan, National Geographic 120 (September 1961) 384, 391-392. Lake Changhai Long Lake , Sichuan Province. A Chinese scientist saw a 10-foot miracle animal with a horse's head and a huge body on October 12, 1984. Janet and Colin Bord, Unexplained Mysteries of the 20th Century (Chicago Contemporary Books, 1989), p. 355 UNEP-WCMC, Protected Areas Programme,...

Kaptar

Etymology Avar (North East Caucasian) word. Variant names Kara-pishik, Keetar, Kheeter, Meshe-adam (Azerbaijani Turkic, forest man), Tukhli-adam, Veshshi-adam. Physical description Height, 5-7 feet. Covered in 1-inch-long hair. Color varies from reddish-brown in smaller individuals to dark brown, dark gray, black, and silvered. Head-hair reaches to shoulders. Only slightly hairy on the face. Wide shoulders. Slightly stoop-shouldered. Long arms. Palms and soles free of hair. Fingers thick and...

Mourou Ngou

Etymology Banda (Ubangi), water leopard. The name is also used for the Giant otter shrew (Potomogale velox), an aquatic insectivore nearly 2 feet long. Variant names Muru-ngu, Nze-ti-gou (Sango Creole, water leopard), Ze-ti-ngu. Physical description Shaped like a leopard. Length, about 8-12 feet. Brownish, striped, or dappled with blue and white spots. Small head. Glowing eyes. Large fangs. Tail like a leopard's, though hairier. Behavior Amphibious. Nocturnal. Roaring cry like a strong wind....

Piasa

Piasa Monster

Legendary BIRD depicted in a petroglyph on a bluff by the Mississippi River in Illinois. Etymology Illini (Algonquian) word of unknown derivation. Similar to the Cree (Algonquian) piyesiw (thunderbird) and the Ojibwa (Algonquian) binesi (large bird). In Kickapoo (Algonquian), peisa means cat to the Miami and Peoria (Algonquian), paisa means dwarf, while to the Meskawki (Algonquian), paia'shi-wuk were Little People. An alternative suggestion is from the French paillissa (palisade), meaning the...

Kooloo Kamba

Etymology Mbama (Bantu), either from n'koula (chimpanzee) or from its call kooloo + kamba (speak). Scientific name Pan troglodytes koolokamba, given by W. C. Osman-Hill in 1967. Variant names Choga, Dedieka, Ebot (Bulu Bantu), Itsena, Koolakamba, Koula-nguia (Kele Bantu, koula chimpanzee + nguia gorilla), Koulou-nguira, Kulu-kampa, Kulu-kanba, N'tchego, Sipandjee. Physical description Larger than a normal chimpanzee. Cranium is larger than a chimpanzee's, with some cresting. Ebony-black,...

Beruang Rambai

Etymology Land Dayak (Austronesian), long-haired bear, the common name for the sun bear. Variant name Bali djakai (Lawangan Aus-tronesian, demon). Physical description Robust body. Shoulder height, 4 feet. Height standing erect, 6 feet. Covered in black hair. Bullet-shaped head. Bull neck. Hair on arms and thighs is 3 inches long. Thick legs. Behavior Walks on all fours. Stands on its hind legs occasionally. Beats its chest. Tracks Both humanlike and bearlike. Distribution Central Kalimantan,...

Deep Sea Spider

Mystery Invertebrate of the South Pacific Ocean. Physical description Triangular fore body, 0.52 inches in lengt h. Hind body, 2 inches long, separat ed from t he front by a narrow waist. Five pairs of jointed appendages on the fore body. The first pair seems t o be used as feelers. The second pair is very long and carried high above t he body. The last t hree pairs are walking legs. Significant sighting During t he first Dist ur-bance and Recolonizat ion Experiment in a Manganese Nodule Area...

Nzefu Loi

Etymology Luba (Bantu), water elephant. Physical description Nearly the size of a hippopotamus. Long neck. Short and heavy ivory tusks. Hairy tail like a horse's. Behavior Amphibious. Formerly hunted by the Baluba people using special traps. Distribution Lakes near the Lualaba River between Bukama and Kaniamba, Democratic Republic of the Congo. Possible explanations (1) The aquatic variety of the PYGMY Elephant, suggested by Bernard Heuvelmans. (2) A surviving saber-toothed cat, also suggested...

Nandi Bear

A ferocious mystery animal of East Africa, variously described as a PRIMATE, a HYENA, or a Bear. Etymology Named after the Nandi people, a Kalenjin-speaking group who live in the area around Kapsabet in Kenya's Rift Valley, where the animal has been widely reported. One of the first sightings by a European was made by Geoffrey Williams, who compared the creature he saw to a bear. The animals reported in subsequent descriptions were much less bearlike. Variant names Booaa, Chemisit, Duba...

Lophenteropneust

Unknown Invertebrate of the South Pacific Ocean. Etymology Greek, ridged enteropneust. Scientific name Lophenteropneusta, given by Henning Lemche. Physical description Length, 2-4 inches. Cylindrical, translucent body. A ring of tentacles surrounds the mouth. Terminal anus. Tracks Spirals and loops of fecal strings. Significant sightings In 1962, the Scripps Institute of Oceanography's Proa Expedition in the research vessel Spencer F. Baird took some 4,000 photos of the sea bottom in five...

Cetaceans Unknown

Whales, dolphins, and porpoises belong to the Order Cetacea, a group of mammals that have completely adopted an aquatic existence. They have streamlined, hairless bodies with two front flippers, no hind legs, a muscular tail for propulsion, and a blowhole at the top of the head for breathing. There are two main types The Toothed whales (Odontocetes) include dolphins, porpoises, sperm whales, the beluga, the narwhal, and beaked whales the toothless Baleen whales (Mysticetes) include the...

Venezuelan Monitor

Physical description Large monitor lizard. Distribution Galeras de El Pao, in Guarico and Cojedes States, Venezuela near Angel Falls, Bolivar State, Venezuela the Cerro Santa Ana, Peninsula de Paraguana, Falcon State, Venezuela. Significant sightings A prospector from Caracas told ecologist L on Croizat in 1972 that a large lizard resembling a Komodo dragon lived in the Galeras de El Pao. Herpetologist J. B. Graham saw a large, unknown lizard near the base of...

Thai Mammoth

Physical description Elephant with long hair on its back and around the tusks. Distribution Northwestern Thailand. Significant sighting Thai princess Rangsrino-padorn Yukol took some blurry aerial photographs of a herd of twenty-eight elephants in the Omkoi District of northwestern Thailand during a forestry survey by helicopter in 1984. She characterized the animals as surviving mammoths. Present status An expedition announced by the princess in December 2000 was called off at the request of...

Five Lined Constellation Fish

One of Beebe's Abyssal Fishes of the North Atlantic Ocean. Scientific name Bathysidus pentagrammus, given by William Beebe. Physical description Roundish body. Five lines of purple and yellow photophores on the sides. Large eyes. Small pectoral fins. Distribution North Atlantic Ocean. Significant sighting Observed only once at 1,900 feet by William Beebe in a bathysphere off Bermuda in the early 1930s. Possible explanation Carl Hubbs thought Beebe had seen a mass of jellyfish distorted by the...

Neo Giant

Sanderson for GIANT Hominids, including the Dzu-Teh, Bigfoot, Sisemite, and Mapinguari. Neo-giant is also the name used by Mark A. Hall to distinguish Bigfoot from the Shorter Hominid, the Taller Hominid, and the True Giant. Physical description Average height, 7 feet. Tracks Length, 10-20 inches. Width, 3-9 inches. Has an hourglass shape. Toes are roughly the same size. The ball behind the big toe is split. The toes are positioned obliquely on the foot, slanting from big...

Irkuiem

Etymology Koryak or Chukot (Chukotko-Kamchatkan), trousers pulled down. Variant names Irquiem, Kainyn-kutkho (god-bear). Physical description General shape of a polar bear. Shoul der height, 4 feet 7 inches. Weight, more than 2,000 pounds. White coat. Narrow body. Small head. Long forelegs. A bulge of fat hangs down between the short hind legs. Behavior Does not run but is said to move by throwing down its front l egs and heaving the hind legs forward to meet them. Said to cross the Chukchi Sea...

How to Use This Book

My first brush with cryptozoology was in 1960 when I read On the Track of Unknown Animals by Belgian zoologist Bernard Heuvelmans. It was a life-changing experience. Heuvelmans's masterful scientific, historical, and literary sleuthing in quest of elusive fauna was both exciting and scholarly he seemed a combination of Sherlock Holmes and The Lost World's Professor Challenger. His volume prodded my ten-year-old brain to take a keen interest in not only science and history but also different...

Oil Pit Squid

Length, 6-8 inches. Diameter, 1 inch. Grayish-red color. Tentacles. Habitat Oil-emulsion pits containing antifreeze, stripper, oil, and chemicals used in manufacturing plastic automobile bumpers. Distribution Anderson, indiana. Significant sighting On November 15, 1996, workers cleaning out a sludge pit at the GMC Delphi Interior and Lighting plant in Anderson, Indiana, found many squidlike animals swimming in the toxic liquid. One of the animals was caught and...

Gopogo

Freshwater Monster of British Columbia, Canada. Etymology From a British music hall hit The Ogo-Pogo, written in 1924 by Cumberland Clark with music by Mark Strong and made famous by Davy Burnaby. At a luncheon on August 23, 1926, W. H. Brimblecombe of Vernon, British Columbia, sang a parody written by H. F. Beattie that was modified to incorporate some characteristics of the Okanagan Lake monster. Ronald Kenvyn of the Vancouver Daily Province declared Ogopogo its official name on August 24,...

Genaprugwirion

Etymology From Welsh genau (mouth) + pryf (insect) + gwirion (silly) silly insect-eater ( ). Variant name Cenaprugwirion. Physical description Length, 12 inches. Muddy-brown color. Head is the size of an orange. Pronounced dewlap. Long tongue. Behavior Rolls its eyes continually. Lives in a burrow, poking its head out to catch flies or insects. Distribution Aber Soch, Lleyn Peninsula, Gwynedd, Wales. Present status Now rare but said to be common long ago. (1) Naturalized population of a...

Canadian Alligator

Variant name Pitt Lake Lizard. Physical description Length, usually 5-10 feet, wit h a maximum of 20 feet. Relat ively smooth, dark skin. Horns or ears are sometimes report ed. Long snout. Jaws 12 inches long. Four legs, 10 inches long. Behavior Aquatic but seen on land occasionally. Distribution Pit t Lake, Koot enay Lake, Chill-iwack Lake, Cult us Lake, Nitinat Lake, and the Fraser River, in British Columbia. Significant sightings On October 10, 1900,...

Beast of Gvaudan

An enigmatic Dog, wolf, or Hyena of south-central France. Etymology G vaudan was the old name for an area that roughly corresponds to the modern department of Loz re, France. Physical description Bigger than a wolf. Reddish color. Large head. Small, pointed, upright ears. Muzzle like a greyhound dog's. Wide, gray chest. Black streaks on the back. Hind legs are longer than forelegs. Cropped tail. Behavior Active in the daytime. Said to be able to leap a distance of 28 feet and stand on its hind...

Shamanu

Scientific name Canis lupus hodophilax, given by C. J. Temminck in 1839. Variant names Hondo wolf, Honshu wolf, Japanese wolf, Nihon okami. Physical description Like the gray wolf but smaller. Length, 2 feet 9 inches. Ash-gray or beige color. Short ears. Shoulder height, 14 inches. Short legs. Black tail tip. Distribution Nara Prefecture and the Chichibu-Tama National Park in Saitama Prefecture, Honshu, Japan. Significant sightings On October 14, 1996, Hiroshi Yagi took nineteen photographs of...

Stellers Sea

A large SIRENIAN of the North Pacific Ocean, presumed extinct since 1768. Scientific name Hydrodamalis gigas, given by Eberhard Zimmerman in 1780. Variant name Kapustnik (Russian, cabbage-eater). Physical description Length, 20-26 feet. Weight, up to 10 metric tons. Tough, dark-brown skin. Rotund body. Small head. No functional teeth. Bilobate tail. Behavior Average submergence time, four to five minutes. Strictly a seaweed-eater. Distribution Gulf of Anadyr, Siberia Commander Islands in the...

Super Otter

A category of SEA MONSTER identified by Bernard Heuvelmans. Scientific names Hyperhydra egedei, given by Heuvelmans in 1965 modified to Hyperhydra norvegica by Lars Thomas in 1996. Physical description Elongated, otterlike shape but may show six to seven bends. Length, 65-100 feet. Uniform light or grayish-brown. Skin appears rough or wrinkled. Long head, flat on top and tapering toward the snout. Small eyes. Teeth often seen. Slender neck of medium length. Two pairs of webbed feet with...

Jungli Admi

Multipurpose name for the Yeti , Hindu ascetics, or any group of people living in the mountains of Central Asia. Etymology From the Urdu (Indo-Aryan) jan-gli (wild) + admi (man). Behavior Said to use a bow and arrow. Distribution Nepal Bhutan Sikkim Province, northern India. Significant sighting In May 1940, C. Reginald Cooke and his wife, Margaret, were on the Sikkim-Nepal border at an altitude of 14,000 feet when they found and took photographs of tracks in the ground made by a heavy creature...

Double Banded Argus

Scientific name Argusianus bipunctatus, proposed by T. W. Wood in 1871. Placed in the same genus as the Great argus of Indonesia. Physical description Has two reddish-brown bands with white dots on its primary feather, instead of one band. Distribution Java in Indonesia or Tioman Island, Johor State, Malaysia. Significant sighting Pheasant of uncertain origin, known from a single feather in the British Museum of Natural History. Possible explanations (1) Surviving fossil pheasant of some type....

Windigo

John Morris Anthropologist

Originally, a Native American name for a Cannibal Giant in northern North America. Now more commonly known as a supposed psychological compulsion to eat human flesh, said to occur among the Algonquian peoples of Canada and called Windigo psychosis. The craving is said to be brought on by desperate cannibalism during a famine. The reality of this syndrome has been challenged, though the condition may in fact have been used in the past as an excuse to expel or execute an outcast. In recent...

Phoenix Chinese

One of the four sacred animals of Chinese mythology. Variant names Feng-huang (Chinese Sino-Tibetan), U-feng. Physical description The plumage consists of the five fundamental colors of black, white, red, green, and yellow. The head is like a pheasant's or rooster's. Large beak like a parrot's. Back like a tortoise's. Body like a mandarin duck's. The male is said to have three legs. Long tufts of display feathers are like a peacock's. In more recent accounts, the...

Wudewasa

WlLDMAN of Europe, often depicted in medieval art, sculpture, heraldry, drama, pageantry, and allegorical fiction. Etymology Old English, wood man, from wold (forest) + wasan (being). An alternative suggestion is that wasa derives from vu'assar (from Asia). The English surnames Wood-house and Wodehouse are said to originate from this word. Variant names Callicantzari (Greek), Fangge (in the Alps), Fanke, Green man, Grendel, Gru-agach (Irish), Hazessa (Saxon), Holzmoia (German), Holzwib, Homine...

Madagascan Hawk Moth Giant

Undiscovered insect (Invertebrate) of Madagascar. Scientific name Xanthopan sp. Physical description Hawk moth with a 16-inch proboscis. Distribution Lake It asy, Madagascar. Possible explanation The epiphyt ic Madagascan orchid Angraecum longicalcar has a rostrel-lum about 16 inches deep that leads to its nec-t ar -pr oducing or gans. No known local mot h has a proboscis that long. However, entomologist Gene Krit sky pr edict s t hat one must exist, since t he plant manages to pr opagat e it...

Nessie

Loch Ness Monster Arthur Grant

Freshwater Monster of Loch Ness, Scotland. Etymology From the Gaelic an Niseag, a feminine diminutive derived from the name of the loch. It probably originated with the 1933 sightings. The term Loch Ness monster may first have been used by Evan Barron, editor of the Inverness Courier, in a May 2, 1933, story. Scientific name Nessiteras rhombopteryx, given by Peter Scott and Robert Rines in 1975 and based on the underwater photographs of 1972 and 1975. The name means the Ness wonder with the...

Werewolf

Canine or vulpine Entity of Europe and North America. Although only of tangential relevance, the Werewolf nonetheless crops up with some frequency in cryptozoological literature, as a folk explanation for Alien Big Dogs or the Beast OF Gevaudan or as a source of confusion with sightings of paranormal-looking Hairy Bipeds. Etymology From the Old English wer (man) + wulf (wolf'), derived from the Greek lycanthropos (wolf-man). Adam Douglas argues, however, that the were- prefix comes from the Old...

Yowie

Etymology From the Yuwaalaraay (Australian) yuwi (dream spirit). Listed in old Aboriginal glossaries as ghost or dream spirit. Variations of the term have been used along the New South Wales coast since the 1930s. The Mulgoa and Burragorang peoples referred to the hairy giants as Yowies in the 1960s. Variant names Australian bush ape, Bugaloo (in Tasmania), Dulugal, Gooligah (in New South Wales), Hairy man, JlNGARA, Koy-orowen, Makoron koro (in Tasmania), Moolu-wonk (in South Australia),...

Storsjoodjuret

Physical description Serpentine. Length, 10-45 feet. Width, 3-4 feet. Shiny skin, greenish to grayish. Round head like a cat's or a dog's, 3 feet wide. Reports from the nineteenth century describe a horselike head with a long, white mane. Large, dark eyes. Long, sail-like ears (or dorsal crest) that it presses back against its neck. Long, flickering tongue. Neck, 8-10 feet long. Multiple humps. Two pairs of stumpy legs or fins. Powerful tail. Behavior Most...

Giant Hominids

In this category are humanlike, hairy creatures that are described as 6 feet 6 inches tall or greater. Their bipedal gait, appearance, and behavior indicate a closer relationship to humans (hcminids) than to the apes (primates). The only known fossil that comes close to giant status is Gigantopithecus, a huge ape first recognized by Dutch anthropologist G. H. R. von Koenigswald from a single molar he purchased in a Hong Kong pharmacy in 1935. Since then, more than 1,000 other teeth and a few...

Gigantic Octopus

Fofi Sightings

A huge Cephalopod of the North Atlantic Ocean. Scientific names Octopus giganteus, given by Addison E. Verrill in 1897 Otoctopus giganteus, proposed by Michel Raynal in 1986. Distribution From the east coast of Florida to Bermuda, Belize, and south Texas. Significant sightings On November 30, 1896, a huge carcass was found washed up on Anastasia Beach, near St. Augustine, Florida. DeWitt Webb, a local medical doctor, examined and took several photographs of it. The specimen was 20 feet long, 4...

Mediterranean Giant Snake

Physical description Length, 6 33 feet. Green. Distribution Southern Spain southern France northern and central Italy Greece Serbia. Significant sightings On July 22, 1969, a 7-foot, green snake caused a traffic accident when it crossed a road near Chinchilla de Monte Arag n, Albicete Province, Spain. A 6-foot snake with a huge head was seen several times on a farm in Orihuela, Alicante Province, Spain, in June 1970. A monstrous serpent with a mane and a head like a baby's was seen in July 1973...

Hungarian Reedwolf

Scientific names Canis lupus minor, given by M. Mojsisovics in 1887 Canis aureus hungari-cus, renamed by Gyula fihik in 1938. Variant name Rohrwolf (German). Physical description Like a small wolf. Distribution Hungary eastern Austria. Present status Apparently became extinct in the early twentieth century. Some museum specimens exist. (1) A diminutive subspecies of Gray wolf (Canis lupus), first suggested by M. Mojsisovics and now the generally accepted identification. (2) A large Golden...

Beast of Exmoor

Black Beast Exmoor

British Big Cat of southwestern England. Physical description Large, black cat or dog. Length, 3 feet 4 feet 6 inches. Shoulder height, 2 feet 6 inches. White markings on the head and neck. Squat head. Short neck. Powerful, muscular body. Short legs. Behavior Nocturnal. Moves rapidly from cover to cover. Kills sheep by breaking the neck at the second vertebra or crushing the skull. Tracks Large, doglike prints, 4 inches across. Smaller tracks may be a female's. Distribution Exmoor, in the...

Ivory Billed Woodpecker

Large Bird of the Woodpecker family (Picidae) in the southern United States and Cuba, presumed extinct. Scientific names Campephilus principalis principalis (in United States), given by Carl von Linn in 1758 C. p. bairdii (in Cuba), given by John Cassin in 1863. PP'hysical description Length, 20 inches. Tall, scarl et crest (mal es) bl ack crest (femal es). White bill. White stripes on either side of the neck. Large patches of white on the wings. Behavior Feeds on wood-boring beetle larvae that...

Dragon British

Snakelike monster of the British Isles see Semi-mythical Beasts. Variant names Amphiptere, Knucker (from Old English Nicor), Nykur Weish Winged Snake, Worm, Wyvern. Physical description Serpentine. Slimy body. Black, red, yellow, or white. Red eyes. Forked tongue. Sharp teeth. Sometimes winged. Sometimes with two or four legs, other times limbless. Behavior Basks in the sun. Can fly. Spits venom. Can rejoin or regenerate severed body parts. Breathes fire. Drinks large quantities of milk. Eats...

Saharan Crested Snake

Physical description Length, 30-120 feet. Dark brown with black diamonds on back. Whitish below with dark-gray stripes. Pointed snout. Black crest about 4 inches long on head. Large, chestnut eyes. Thicker body segment about 13 feet long behind a thin neck. Rest of tail tapers to a point. Significant sightings In 255 B.C. during the First Punic War, after a lengthy struggle in which catapults and siege engines were put to use, the legions of Roman consul Marius Atilius Regulus killed an...

Ngiioi Rtfng

Etymology Vietnamese (Austroasiatic), forest man. Variant names Briaou (in Laos), Khi trau (buffalo monkey or big monkey). Physical description Height, less than 5 feet. Covered in reddish, gray, brown, or black hair. The back of the forearm is said to have a sharp bone. Allegedly has a tail. Behavior Bipedal. Climbs trees easily. Uses its forearm to cut through jungle undergrowth. Food consists of roots, plants, and the sap of banana trees. Shakes trees for insects. Sleeps in rocky areas. Said...

Grotte Cosquer Animal

Paleolithic cave art depicting a Sea MONSTERin France. Physical description Fat, bulky body. Small head on a relatively long neck. Two flexible front flippers and two pointed rear flippers. Distribution Grotte Cosquer, Cap Morgiou, near Marseille, France. Present status This underwater cave was discovered in 1985 by Henri Cosquer, who also found the artwork six years later. The entrance, 120 feet below water level, would have been above water during the Ice Age. The charcoal drawings of animals...

Gung

Etymology Unknown, although the Australian jingy or chingah were terms used in Western Australia during the nineteenth century for devils or evil spirits. Variant names Barmi birgoo, Illankanpanka (in central Queensland), Jimbra (in Western Australia), Jingra, Jinka (in Western Australia), Kraitbull (in South Australia), Lo-an (in Yarra Flats, Victoria), Pankalanka (in Northern Territory), Tjangara (in South Australia), Wolumbin. In Victoria, Lowan (Lo-an) is used for the Mallee fowl (Leipoa...

Ri

Variant names Ilkai (Sursurunga Austrone-sian), Pishmeri (Pidgin, fish-woman). Physical description Dark or light-brown body. Length, 5-7 feet. Human head, arms, torso, and genitalia. Long head-hair. Eyes in the front of the head. Protruding mouth. Females have breasts. Arms are fused to the side of the body. Palms are ridged and calloused, and the fingernails are long and sharp. The lower trunk terminates in a pair of flippers. Internal body fat is said to...

Multifinned Sea Monster

A category of Sea MONSTER identified by Bernard Heuvelmans. Scientific name Cetioscolopendra aeliani, given by Heuvelmans in 1965. Variant names Elian's sea centipede, Cetacean centipede, Con Ri'T Many-finned sea monster, Tompondrano. P hysical description Elongated body with peculiar lateral projections that look like forward-pointing fins, only four to twelve of which are usually seen above water. Length, 30-100 feet, with a probable average of 60-70 feet. Skin is smooth like tanned leather....

Lizards Unknown

Lizards make up the Suborder Lacertilia of the large reptilian Order Squamata, which also includes Snakes and Amphisbaenians (Worm lizards). In general, lizards are small- to medium-sized scaly reptiles with four clawed feet, elongated bodies, and tapering tails. Some are highly arboreal, others specialize in burrowing, and still others are occasionally bipedal. There are four lizard infraorders Gekkota, Igua-nia, Scincomorpha, and Anguimorpha. Infraorder Gekkota includes Geckos (Gekkonidae and...

Merhorse

A category of Sea Monster identified by Bernard Heuvelmans. Scientific name Halshippus olaimagni, given by Heuvelmans in 1965. Physical description Elongated, with smooth, shiny skin. Length, 15-100 feet, though rarely exceeding 60 feet. Dark-brown or steel-gray to black in northern regions mahogany in warmer regions. Skin is smooth and shiny, possibly with short fur. Wide, flat, diamond-shaped head, described as similar to that of a horse, camel, snake, or hog. Head, 3 feet long. Wide mouth,...

Devils Hoofmarks

Tracks made by a myst ery mammal, possibly a Rodent in England and elsewhere. Etymology Newspapers in 1855 report ed t hat some people at t ribut ed t he marks t o Sat an. Tracks Vaguely donkeylike some appear t o have been made by hooves, while ot hers do not . Length, 3.5-4 inches. Width, 1.5-2.75 inches. Depth, 0.5-4 inches. The prints are 8-16 inches apart and direct ly in front of each ot her, rat her t han alt ernat ing left and right . Significant sightings On t he night of February 8-9,...

Queensland Tiger

Variant names Native tiger, Queensland tiger-cat, Yaddi, Yarri (Herbert River area), Yedna tiger. In the Warlpiri (Australian) language of the Northern Territory, yarri is a verb meaning to threaten or to attack. In Queensland, the term is also used for the Spotted-tailed quoll or Tiger-cat (Dasyurus macula- tus). In the south part of Western Australia, it refers to the Blackbutt eucalyptus tree (Eucalyptus patens). Physical description Heavier build than a domestic cat. Length, 4-5 feet,...

Nalusa Falaya

Etymology Choctaw (Muskogean), long black being. Variant names Bohpoli (thrower), Devil Monkey, Hattak chito (big man), Kasheho-TAPALO, Kowi anakasha (forest dweller), Kwanokasha. Physical description Humanlike. Gray or brown hair. Small eyes. Long, pointed ears. Long arms. Behavior Slides on its stomach to approach humans. Stooped but speedy walk. Throws sticks and stones. Assists in the preparation of Native American medicines and takes children into the woods to teach them about herbs and...

Fuegopithecus Pakensis

Etymology Ona (Chon) word plural, Yoshil. Scientific name Fuegopithecus pakensis, given by Manuel Palacios. Variant names Cushpij, Hanush (Yamara), Yose. Physical description Height, 2 feet 6 inches. Yellowish-green hair. Bald on the back of the head. Large penis. Behavior Bipedal. Rubs the back of its head against trees. Eats fruits, mushrooms, and grubs. Carries a stone or a club as a weapon. Warms itself by the fires of hunters at night. Sometimes wears foxskin clothes. Tracks Leaves a trail...

Kapre

Etymology Bikol and Tagalog (Austronesian) word derived from the Spanish kafre (Moor). Physical description Height, 8 feet or more. Covered with hair. Dark, rough skin. Large eyes some accounts say there is only one. Big ears. Flat nose. Big mouth. Thick lips. Humanlike face, hands, and feet. Behavior Nocturnal. Active during new moons or after rainfall. Upright gait. Has a pungent odor. Omnivorous but fond of mangoes, pineapples, tamarind fruit, coconuts, papayas, radishes, fishes, land crabs,...