Table 712

Carotenoid Sources of Commercial Importance

Source

Annatto (Bixa orellana)

Carotenes (vegetables: carrot, grass alfalfa, and vegetable oil) Dunaliella sp.

Marigold (Tagetes erecta)

Paprika (Capsicum annum)

Saffron (Crocus sativus)

Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum)

Synthetic carotenoids

Main

Carotenoids

Bixin and norbixin

ß-Carotene

Haematococcus sp. Astaxanthin

Uses

Coloring foods, cosmetics, and textiles

ß-Carotene Feed additive

Lutein and zeaxanthin

Capsanthin and capsorubin

Crocetin and

Lycopene and ß-carotene

ß-Carotene, ß-apo-8'-carotenal, cantaxanthin

Feed and food additive and dietary supplement

Feed additive and as nutraceutical agent

As additive of poultry and fishery feed; purified oleoresin as food additive (e.g., pastas, vegetable oils, margarine, baking goods) in Europe

Used in foods to add flavor and color as a spice: e.g., pizza, salsa, meat, soups, sauces, salad dressings, snacks, processed cheese, confectionery, baked goods Foods, mainly specialties because of its high cost, and pharmaceutical products Tomato as food ingredient and lycopene preparations as a nutraceutical and food colorant As food and feed additives and nutraceuticals

Presentation

Oil-soluble extracts (0.2 to 0.3%

of pigment) Oil suspensions (4% of pigment) Water-soluble extracts (around 5%)

Spray-dried products (up to 14%) Oleoresins

Solutions or suspensions in food-grade vegetable/plant oil and water-dispersible powders formulated using approved food additives Solutions or suspensions, water-or oil-dispersible presentations, freeze-dried products Dried flower petals, oleoresin, and purified oleoresin

Paprika powder and oleoresin

Saffron powders and extracts

Different tomato presentations

Water-dispersible products, colloidal suspensions, oily solutions

Source: Adapted from Francis (1999).109

Was this article helpful?

0 0

Post a comment