Rsm

FIGURE 3.9. In the prone position, extension can also be quantitated in an assisted fashion.

FIGURE 3.10. (A, B) Supine, with the hip flexed 90 degrees, the hip ternatively, rotational motion can be recorded with the hip extended is maximally rotated internally and externally with motions in the prone position. Whatever method is chosen, it is important recorded. This method is simple, quick, and reproducible. (C, D) AI- to be consistent on sequential examinations.

FIGURE 3.10. (A, B) Supine, with the hip flexed 90 degrees, the hip ternatively, rotational motion can be recorded with the hip extended is maximally rotated internally and externally with motions in the prone position. Whatever method is chosen, it is important recorded. This method is simple, quick, and reproducible. (C, D) AI- to be consistent on sequential examinations.

FIGURE 3.11. (A, B) The hip is abducted and adducted, and range of motion is recorded relative to the midline.
FIGURE 3.12. Often the patient waves the hand over a large area of involvement. However, the patient is asked, with encouragement and instruction, to point with one finger to the area of maximal involvement.

SYMPTOM LOCALIZATION The One-Finger Rule

Although this is less well applied to the hip than to other joints, such as the knee, it is still important to ask the patient to use one finger and point to the spot that hurts the worst (Figure 3.12). This test provides much useful information before beginning palpation. It allows the examiner to discern the point of maximal tenderness. Consequently, this area is reserved until last when performing the examination. This forces the examiner to be more systematic, exploring uninvolved areas first, and enhances the patient's trust

"This is where it hurts?"

Essentials of Human Physiology

Essentials of Human Physiology

This ebook provides an introductory explanation of the workings of the human body, with an effort to draw connections between the body systems and explain their interdependencies. A framework for the book is homeostasis and how the body maintains balance within each system. This is intended as a first introduction to physiology for a college-level course.

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