Prototype design of active cotton wound dressings

Cotton gauze has been manufactured and utilized for the last two centuries as a standard wound dressing in the care of both acute and chronic wounds. Although it is still used in much the same manner as originally conceived, there have been some fiber modifications that have improved its quality and versatility in medical applications.

The protease human neutrophil elastase found in high concentration in the chronic wound creates considerable protein destruction and prevents the wound from healing [25]. The design of wound dressings that selectively sequester proteases from the chronic wound is couched in the concept that molecular

Figure 2.4. Computer graphic model of peptide-bound cellulose docked at the active site of human neutrophil elastase. Cellulose is depicted as the green and red CPK model. The peptide portion of the conjugate is a ball and stick model shown docked within the yellow highlighted ribbon depicting the active site of elastase

Figure 2.4. Computer graphic model of peptide-bound cellulose docked at the active site of human neutrophil elastase. Cellulose is depicted as the green and red CPK model. The peptide portion of the conjugate is a ball and stick model shown docked within the yellow highlighted ribbon depicting the active site of elastase features and properties of the protease can be used to tailor the molecular design of the cotton fiber needed for selective sequestration of the protease. Thus, the enzyme size, overall charge, and active site mechanism for binding substrate may be employed to create the appropriate fiber design that might best bind the enzyme selectively. The design approach of the prototype for selective sequestration is a molecular model of a cellulose conjugate containing an active site recognition sequence docked to the active site of human neutrophil elastase as shown in Figure 2.4. The subsites of enzyme active site interaction consist of the sequence conjugate H-Val-Pro-Glycine-O-ester-Cellulose.

Was this article helpful?

0 0

Post a comment