Parts Of A Flower

Recall that early land plants lacked leaves and roots and consisted of only stems. Leaves evolved from branches of stems. Botanists consider flowers to be highly specialized branches and the parts of a flower to be specialized leaves. These specialized leaves form on the swollen tip of a floral "branch" or receptacle.

Flower parts are usually found in four concentric whorls, or rings, as shown in Figure 30-5. Sepals (SEE-puhlz) make up the outer whorl. They protect the other parts of a developing flower before it opens. Petals make up the next whorl. Most animal-pollinated flowers have brightly colored petals. The petals and sepals of windpollinated plants are usually small or absent.

The two innermost whorls of flower parts contain the reproductive structures. The male reproductive structures are stamens (STAY-muhnz), each of which consists of an anther and a filament. An anther contains microsporangia, which produce microspores that develop into pollen grains. A stalklike filament supports an anther. The innermost whorl contains the female reproductive structures, which are called carpels (KAHR-puhlz).

Stamen -

Filament Anther

Stigma

Style

Ovary

Petal

Filament Anther

Stigma

Style

Ovary

Stamen -

Petal

-Pistil

(fused carpels)

' /Receptacle

Sepal

Ovule

-Pistil

(fused carpels)

' /Receptacle

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