Large Carbon Molecules

Many carbon compounds are built up from smaller, simpler molecules known as monomers (MAH-ne-mers), such as the ones shown in Figure 3-3. As you can also see in Figure 3-3, monomers can bond to one another to form polymers (PAWL-eh-mer). A polymer is a molecule that consists of repeated, linked units. The units may be identical or structurally related to each other. Large polymers are called macromolecules. There are many types of macromolecules, such as carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids.

Monomers link to form polymers through a chemical reaction called a condensation reaction. Each time a monomer is added to a polymer, a water molecule is released. In the condensation reaction shown in Figure 3-4, two sugar molecules, glucose and fructose, combine to form the sugar sucrose, which is common table sugar. The two sugar monomers become linked by a C—O—C bridge. In the formation of that bridge, the glucose molecule releases a hydrogen ion, H+, and the fructose molecule releases a hydroxide ion, OH". The OH" and H+ ions that are released then combine to produce a water molecule, H2O.

In addition to building polymers through condensation reactions, living organisms also have to break them down. The breakdown of some complex molecules, such as polymers, occurs through a process known as hydrolysis (hie-DRAHL-i-sis). In a hydrolysis reaction, water is used to break down a polymer. The water molecule breaks the bond linking each monomer. Hydrolysis is the reverse of a condensation reaction. The addition of water to some complex molecules, including polymers, under certain conditions can break the bonds that hold them together. For example, in Figure 3-4 reversing the reaction will result in sucrose breaking down into fructose and glucose.

figure 3-3

A polymer is the result of bonding between monomers. In this example, each monomer is a six-sided carbon ring. The starch in potatoes is an example of a molecule that is a polymer.

figure 3-3

A polymer is the result of bonding between monomers. In this example, each monomer is a six-sided carbon ring. The starch in potatoes is an example of a molecule that is a polymer.

figure 3-4

The condensation reaction below shows how glucose links with fructose to form sucrose. One water molecule is produced each time two monomers form a covalent bond.

The condensation reaction below shows how glucose links with fructose to form sucrose. One water molecule is produced each time two monomers form a covalent bond.

Glucose Fructose Sucrose

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)

H OH

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)

Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate figure 3-5

The hydrolysis of ATP yields adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate. In hydrolysis, a hydrogen ion from a water molecule bonds to one of the new molecules, and a hydroxide ion bonds to the other new molecule. Most hydrolysis reactions release energy.

Word Roots and Origins phosphate from the Latin phosphor, meaning "morning star," (morning stars are very bright, similar to phosphorus when it burns) and ate, meaning "salt"

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