Info

A. Dry at maturity

sweetgum, sycamore

B. Fleshy at maturity

pineapple, fig

Plumule Epicotyl Hypocotyl —*

Seed coat fused to -

fruit wall x

Cotyledons r

Seed coat

Endosperm (3n)

Wing x

Cotyledons

Seed coat fused to -

fruit wall r

Seed coat

Hypocotyl

Radicle

Wing

Seed coat

Embryo with cotyledons

Female gametophyte tissue (1n)

Radicle

Seed coat

Embryo with cotyledons

Female gametophyte tissue (1n)

Radicle

(b) CORN KERNEL (MONOCOT)

(c) PINE SEED (GYMNOSPERM)

figure 30-12

(a) A bean seed has two cotyledons and no endosperm. (b) A corn kernel contains a single seed, which has one cotyledon and endosperm. (c) A pine seed has cotyledons and tissue from the female gametophyte.

Materials five different fruits, balance or scale

Predicting Seed Dispersal

Materials five different fruits, balance or scale

Procedure

1. Create a data table that has at least five rows. Your table should have six columns with the following headings: "Fruit name," "Fruit type" (from Table 30-1), "Dry/fleshy," "Seed mass in grams," "Whole fruit mass in grams," and "Dispersal method."

2. Examine your fruits, and fill in your data table. Discuss with your group how characteristics of fruits and seeds might relate to dispersal methods.

Analysis Form a hypothesis about a dispersal method for one of the fruits you have examined. Describe how you might test your hypothesis.

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