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Striae medullares of fourth ventricle Inferior cerebellar peduncle (juxtarestiform body and restiform body) Tuberculum gracile (gracile tubercle) Tuberculum cuneatum (cuneate tubercle) Inferior cerebellar peduncle (juxtarestiform body and restiform body) Tuberculum gracile (gracile tubercle) 2-34 Detailed dorsal view of the brainstem, with cerebellum removed, providing a clear view of the rhomboid fossa (and floor of the fourth ventricle) and contiguous parts of the caudal diencephalon. The...

Striatal Connections

7-22 The origin, course, and distribution of afferent fibers to, and efferent projections from, the neostriatum. These projections are extensive, complex, and in large part, topographically organized only their general patterns are summarized here. Afferents to the caudate and putamen originate from the cerebral cortex (corticostriate fibers), from several of the intralaminar thalamic nuclei (thalamostriate), from the substantia nigra-pars compacta (nigrostriate), and from some of the raphe...

Preface to the Sixth Edition

Previous editions of Neuroanatomy have endeavored 1) to provide a structural basis for understanding the function of the central nervous system 2) to emphasize points of clinical relevance through use of appropriate terminology and examples and 3) to integrate neuro-anatomical and clinical information in a format that will meet the educational needs of the user. The goal of the sixth edition is to continue this philosophy and to present structural information and concepts in an even more...

Review and Study Questions for Chapters 3 and

A 47-year-old woman presents with signs of increased intracranial pressure (vomiting, headache, lethargy). MRI shows a large tumor invading the head of the caudate nucleus, the rostral portion of the putamen and involving a fiber bundle located between these two structures. This fiber bundle is most likely the o (B) anterior limb of the internal capsule o (C) column of the fornix o (E) posterior limb of the internal capsule 2. A 76-year-old woman is diagnosed as having probable Alzheimer's...

Meningitis Meningeal Hemorrhages Meningioma

Cistern Lamina Terminal

A wide variety of disease processes and lesions may involve the meninges only a few examples are mentioned here. Bacterial infections of the meninges (bacterial meningitis) are commonly called leptomeningitis because the causative organisms are usually found in the subarachnoid space and involve the pia and arachnoid. The organism seen in about one-half of adult cases is Streptococcus pneumoniae, while in neonates and children up to about 1 year it is Escherichia coli. The patient becomes...

Internal Morphology of the Spinal Cord and Brain in Stained Sections

Basic concepts that are essential when one is initially learning how to diagnose the neurologically impaired patient include 1 an understanding of cranial nerve nuclei and 2 how these structures relate to long tracts. The importance of these relationships is clearly seen in the combinations of deficits that generally characterize lesions at different levels of the neuraxis. First, deficits of only the body that may present as motor or sensory losses long tracts on the same, or opposite, sides...