Disorders Of Language Dysphasia

Dysphasia is an aquired loss of production or comprehension of spoken and/or written language secondary to brain damage.

Hand preference is associated with 'hemisphere dominance' for language. In right-handed people the left hemisphere is dominant; in left-handed people the left hemisphere is dominant in most, though 25% have a dominant right hemisphere.

The cortical centres for language reside in the dominant hemisphere.

1. Broca's area 2 and 3 Receptive areas

Receptive and expressive areas must be linked in order to integrate function. The link is provided by (4), the arcuate fasciculus, a fibre tract which runs forwards in the subcortical white matter.

Dysphasia may develop as a result of vascular, neoplastic, traumatic, infective or degenerative disease of the cerebrum when language areas are involved.

Executive or motor area for the production of language - lies in the inferior part of the frontal lobe on the lateral surface of the cerebral hemisphere abutting the mouth of the Sylvian fissure.

1. Broca's area 2 and 3 Receptive areas

Here the spoken word is understood and the appropriate reply or action initiated. These areas lie at the posterior end of the Sylvian fissure on the lateral surface of the hemisphere.

The temporal lobe receptive area (2) lies close to the auditory cortex of the transverse gyrus of the temporal lobe. The parietal lobe receptive area (3) lies within the angular gyrus.

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