Acute infectious diarrhea

A. Infectious diarrhea is usually classified as noninflammatory or inflammatory, depending on whether the infectious organism has invaded the intestinal mucosa.

B. Noninflammatory infectious diarrhea is caused by organisms that produce a toxin (enterotoxigenic E coli strains, Vibrio cholerae). Noninflammatory, infectious diarrhea is usually self-limiting and lasts less than 3 days.

C. Blood or mucus in the stool suggests inflammatory disease, usually caused by bacterial invasion of the mucosa (enteroinvasive E coli, Shigella, Salmonella, Campylobacter). Patients usually have a septic appearance and fever; some have abdominal rigidity and severe abdominal pain.

D. Vomiting out of proportion to diarrhea is usually related to a neuroenterotoxin-mediated food poisoning from Staphylococcus aureus or Bacillus cereus, or from an enteric virus, such as rotavirus (in an infant), or a small round virus, such as Norwalk virus (in older children or adults). The incubation period for neuroenterotoxin food poisoning is less than 4 hours, while that of a viral agent is more than 8 hours.

E. Traveler's diarrhea is a common acute diarrhea. Three or four unformed stools are passed/24 hours, usually starting on the third day of travel and lasting 2-3 days. Anorexia, nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, abdominal bloating, and flatulence may also be present.

Breaking Bulimia

Breaking Bulimia

We have all been there: turning to the refrigerator if feeling lonely or bored or indulging in seconds or thirds if strained. But if you suffer from bulimia, the from time to time urge to overeat is more like an obsession.

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