Introduction

This chapter reviews the science and practice of psychological treatment for depression in older adults. In work with older people with depression, knowledge of normal age-related changes is necessary. While it may be a mistake to adopt too positive a perspective on ageing, a negative perspective is much more harmful and unhelpful when working with older people, closing, as it does, one's mind to the possibility of change and learning at all ages. In this chapter, depression in older people is considered within the context of societal attitudes and the demographic changes taking place globally. The increase in longevity suggests that more psychotherapists will come into contact with older people and will need to become much more aware of treatment issues and efficacy data for this population. The chapter also briefly reviews information on the prevalence of depression in older people, and the risk of suicide in older people is also reviewed. To understand the importance of late-life depression, as distinct from depression in younger adult age groups, a number of important concepts are introduced. The chapter also focuses upon the efficacy data on the use of psychological treatments for depression in late life. The chapter concludes with a brief discussion of treatment issues when working psychologically with older people.

How To Add Ten Years To Your Life

How To Add Ten Years To Your Life

When over eighty years of age, the poet Bryant said that he had added more than ten years to his life by taking a simple exercise while dressing in the morning. Those who knew Bryant and the facts of his life never doubted the truth of this statement.

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