Conclusions

The evidence to date for the effectiveness of CBT shows that it is clearly an effective treatment for depression and that it may be particularly beneficial for the prevention of relapse, especially with training in relapse-prevention strategies. The approach is now well established and may be the treatment of choice for many groups. Notwithstanding these strengths, however, there are a number of aspects of both the theory and the practice of CBT that can still be improved. One important such area is that of the role of emotion in the therapy and the theoretical models of understanding cognition and emotion. Modern multilevel theories of emotion (e.g., Power & Dalgleish, 1997; Teasdale & Barnard, 1993) provide more sophisticated models on which to base CBT and, in the process, offer different implications for practice (e.g., Power & Dalgleish, 1999). In addition, there is the continuing accumulation of evidence that good therapists of all persuasions may be more similar in their practice than bad therapists who simply follow textbook accounts of therapy. Future large-scale studies, such as those funded in the USA by NIMH, will provide unique opportunities to disentangle mechanisms of change common across therapies; these analyses will take us to the next level of evidence and beyond the mere percentage game that the current level of evidence provides.

Defeat Depression

Defeat Depression

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