Cognitive Behavioural Model

Cognitive therapy is guided by the principle that thinking, behaviour, mood and physical state can affect each other. The cognitive model for bipolar affective disorder that we propose is largely based on the generic cognitive model for affective disorder (Beck, 1967). According to Beck's cognitive theory of affective disorder, individuals with extreme dysfunctional assumptions are prone to developing affective disorders such as depression. These assumptions are latent when the individuals are outside a mood episode. However, in the face of a congruent life event, these assumptions are activated and may lead to a mood episode such as depression. Once in a depressive state, the individual is prone to make thinking errors and to experience negative automatic thoughts.

The following model is largely pragmatic and takes into account the complex picture of biological, psychological and social elements surrounding manic depression. Figure 12.1 summarises the cognitive model of bipolar affective disorder, which is discussed below in terms of the interaction between dysfunctional cognitions, behaviour, biological vulnerability and mood.

Belief Change 101

Belief Change 101

Do you suffer from a habit or a behavior or a repetitive thought pattern that keeps you from being who you want to be? Do you try to change this or that aspect of your life, but wind up right back where you started? You're not alone! Millions of Americans try to make changes, but the whopping majority fail exceptionally.

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