The growth hormone receptor

GH induces its characteristic biological effects by binding to a specific cell surface receptor. The human receptor is a single-chain 620 amino acid transmembrane polypeptide. Sequence analysis

Hypothalmus

Hypothalmus

Pituitary

Pituitary

Direct effect on many cells

Direct effect on many cells

Figure 11.8 Overview of the mechanisms by which GH induces its biological effects and how its secretion from the pituitary is regulated

indicates it is a member of the haemopoietic receptor superfamily (which includes receptors for several interleukins, GM-CSF and EPO).

Soluble GH-binding proteins (GHBPs) are also found in the circulation. In humans, these GHBPs are generated by enzymatic cleavage of the integral membrane receptor, releasing the GH-binding extracellular domain. The exact physiological role of these binding proteins remains to be elucidated. In serum, GH binds to two such GHBPs, an action that prolongs the hormone's plasma half-life.

Diabetes 2

Diabetes 2

Diabetes is a disease that affects the way your body uses food. Normally, your body converts sugars, starches and other foods into a form of sugar called glucose. Your body uses glucose for fuel. The cells receive the glucose through the bloodstream. They then use insulin a hormone made by the pancreas to absorb the glucose, convert it into energy, and either use it or store it for later use. Learn more...

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